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A Religious Problem

»Posted by on Oct 10, 2012 in Blog, Education History, Mission-Type Stuff | Comments Off on A Religious Problem

A Religious Problem

“. . . we must derive our theory of education from our philosophy of life. The problem turns out to be a religious problem.” T. S. Eliot,...

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U.S. Rugby Ball Grant goes to Ozarks Academy

»Posted by on Aug 22, 2012 in Blog | 1 comment

Look for youth rugby clinics coming to the Springfield area…         August 2012 USRFF Announces Latest Ball Grant Recipients   The United States Rugby Football Foundation has helped introduce the sport to thousands of children by providing size 4 and 5 rugby balls to youth and high school clubs and programs throughout the country. The Foundation is pleased to announce the latest recipients of USRFF Ball Grants. Allis Elementary School, Madison, WI Big Creek Elementary School, Big Creek, CA Brevard Youth Rugby Club, Rockledge, FL Burlington Rugby U19s, Burlington, VT Chicago Dragons Youth Rugby League, Chicago, IL Culpeper Youth Rugby, Culpeper, VA Eastside Lions Youth Rugby Club, Seattle, WA East Mountain High School, Sandia Park, NM...

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Uneducated in the Proper Way

»Posted by on Aug 17, 2012 in Blog, Education History, Literature, Mission-Type Stuff | Comments Off on Uneducated in the Proper Way

St. Gregory of Nazianzus (also known as St. Gregory the Theologian) has been one of the most influential Christian thinkers since the apostles. This is one of these guys who has given us more than we know, even 1600 years later, in our grasp of the Trinitarian foundation of the Christian faith (which Jesus set forth). What we sometimes take now as common Bible sense are in reality mysteries of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit that have not come to us without the battles fought by faithful scholars such as Gregory. And these things matter a great deal in our daily walk and in how we teach our kids. Gregory is well worth listening to, and conveniently for us, but not surprisingly, he found the matter of education an important one. He makes some notable comments in...

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Education that Kills Creativity

»Posted by on Apr 14, 2012 in Childhood Wonder, On the Learning, Poetic Knowledge, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Education that Kills Creativity

“Our bodies are just a way of getting our heads to meetings.” This has been the predominant view of modern education, which, as Ken Robinson shows, educates from the neck up, and “slightly to one side.” The idea is for every student to become a university professor, rather than shaping whole persons according to what they are good at and love to do.  Though he does not address the true telos of education, watch this short lecture for a good laugh and some thoughtful insights: Schools Kill...

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Secular Education Does Not Exist

»Posted by on Mar 28, 2012 in Blog, Education History, On Government Schooling | Comments Off on Secular Education Does Not Exist

In the early days of American government education, R. L. Dabney wrote the following: So is a really secularized education either possible or admissible? Before ours, no people of any age, religion, or civilization, has ever thought so. Against the present attempt, right or wrong, stands the whole common sense of mankind. Pagans, Catholics, Muslims, Greeks and Protestants have all rejected any education not grounded in religion as absurd and wicked. (On Secular Education) He names attempts at secular education “wicked” because they deny God’s sovereign claims. He names these attempts “absurd” because secular education is not possible. That is why we call them mere “attempts.” All education will be religious, as will all...

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Classroom Hobbits & Their Loyalties

»Posted by on Mar 9, 2012 in Blog, Literature, On the Learning | Comments Off on Classroom Hobbits & Their Loyalties

Classroom Hobbits & Their Loyalties

Children are like hobbits not only in stature, but also in how quietly they can sneak about (once a certain coordination is attained), and then finally in the peculiar things they seem to remember most. More similarities could be pointed out, but educators will do well to remember the last one especially. Children have a funny way of remembering what they will remember, and not what they are told to remember. No doubt they have incredible capability to memorize, but what really makes an impression on them is often not what the teacher would expect or intend. The unpredictability of it is much like Frodo and his hobbit companions in their first encounter with elves. Each of them remembers random particulars about this significant event. For one hobbit, it is the...

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